ILS 365: Machiavelli & His World – 3 credits

Introduces students to the major works of Machiavelli through the close reading of his writings in cultural and historical contexts. Discussion and targeted writing assignments will aim at cultivating in students 1) a broad understanding of Machiavelli's principal intellectual attitudes, 2) a deeper understanding of his literary sensibility, and 3) the ability to articulate controversies and complexities surrounding his thought.

Requisites: Satisfied Communications A requirement

Breadth - Literature

Level - Intermediate

Counts as L&S Credit

File: Phillips-Court-Machiavelli-and-His-World-SYLLABUS-1.pdf

ILS 369: Magical Realism & Postmodernity – 3 credits

Examines the concept of magical realism and its cultural implications. Provides a critical framework for evaluating literature, art and movies and engaging in basic research, particularly when it comes to narrative analysis. Pays particular attention to the Latin-American boom, a time of big writers and big literature that presses the limits between fiction and reality, modernity and postmodernity.

Requisites: Sophomore standing

Breadth - Literature

Level - Intermediate

Counts as L&S Credit

File: 1-Syllabus-Magic-Realism-and-Postmodernity-Spring-2022-.docx

ILS 201 – Western Culture: Science, Technology, & Philosophy

What does science have to do with religion? What does it mean to have expertise about the natural world? And what difference do politics and funding sources make to scientific investigation? Learn how to think critically and historically about science in this course by exploring such fundamental questions across two millennia. We begin with ancient mythology and philosophy, then follow the movement of the Greek classical tradition into medieval Islam and Christendom, and finally turn to the ‘revolution’ in science of the 16th and 17th centuries with Copernicus, Galileo, Descartes, and Newton. These historical investigations provide vital insights into ideas of the ‘natural’, scientific observation, and experiment, as well as into our expectations of scientific knowledge and the scientific enterprise.

Requisites: Not open to students with credit for HIST SCI 201.

Breadth - Natural Science

Level - Elementary

Counts as L&S Credit

File: HS_ILS201-fall20-syllabus-HSIA-FINAL.pdf

ILS 200: Critical Thinking & Expression – 3 credits

What does it mean to think critically? To find fault? To employ intellectual rigor? Can we imagine a method of critical thought that produces writing with the potential to change the world? This course takes the definition of “critical thought” seriously in order to expand our idea of what critical communication is and has the potential to be. Explores the three modes of argument and expression: verbal, visual, numerical. Students engage in critical thinking about how these modes are structured and used. Practice in, and interpretation of, the three modes.

Requisite: Satisfied Communications A requirement

Breadth - Humanities

Level - Elementary

Counts as L&S Credit

This course fulfills the Communications B requirement.

File: ILS-200-Fall-2021-SyllabusAnderson.pdf

ILS 371: Sex, Drugs, & Literature in Latin America – 3 credits

Explores Latin American art and literature through historical and psychoanalytic approaches. Topics include: the relationships between literature, art, and violence; how art, literature, and activism contribute to social change; the role of avant-garde movements in art and literature; and the role of art and literature as a mode of empowerment for marginalized groups.

Requisites: Sophomore standing

Breadth - Literature

Level - Intermediate

Counts as L&S Credit

File: 1-Syllabus-Sex-Drugs-and-Literature-Spring-2022.docx

ILS 126: Principles of Environmental Science – 4 credits

This course relates principles of environmental science to our daily activities, with an eye to sustainability, conservation, and systems thinking. It introduces science as a process of inquiry and discovery rather than just a pre-established set of facts. Topics relate to energy, water, and land use, and include food, electric power, materials, buildings, transportation, and waste.

Requisites - None

Breadth - Physical Science

Level - Elementary

Counts as L&S Credit

File: SP22-ENVIRST_ILS-126-Syllabus.pdf

ILS 254: Literature & Science: “Theatre Plays with Science” – 3 credits

This is an interdisciplinary, cross-college course that will bring together Theatre and non-Theatre students, scientists and non-scientists. The aim is introduce students to ways of encountering science and art so that one can think critically about why these two domains have for so long been seen as separate and even mutually excluding, and how one might bring them back into some sort of dialogue. While the title of the course suggests the main trajectory (“Theatre”), there will be room for students to pursue collaborative research and projects based in art forms other than theatre: spoken word, multimedia art, installation art, applied theatre, and the like. Students will read or view a variety of plays that address scientific themes and characters. As well, we'll view and discuss more contemporary multimedia (sometimes virtual) art/theatre/installations with scientific form and/or content. These primary materials would be supplemented by short, layperson-accessible essays on scientific ideas, sometimes supplemented by video material on particular ideas from physics, cosmology, cognitive science, biology, and genetics.

Requisites: Sophomore standing

Breadth - Literature

Level - Intermediate

Counts as L&S Credit

File: SYLLABUS_254_Theatre-Plays-with-Science_.S22docx.docx

ILS 400 Capstone Integration Seminar

Required Capstone for Juniors and Seniors seeking ILS Certificate.

In a participatory seminar, we will explore the relationship between liberal education and leadership. What might Alexander Meiklejohn and those who motivated him–from Socrates and Kant to John Dewey, James Baldwin, Bertolt Brecht, and the justices of the U.S. Supreme Court–teach us about the often fraught link between critical thinking and civic engagement? The first part of this capstone will generate a set of shared questions about liberal education and leadership; the second part will turn the course over to you to grapple collectively with the two weightiest questions Meiklejohn faced, namely, what and how to teach and learn in a diverse and democratic society. The senior capstone offers a chance to look back over your ILS education and forward to the many opportunities and challenges that await you. What will be your “ILS Toolkit” as you head into your future?

Requisites: Junior standing and declared in Certificate in Integrated Liberal Studies

Level - Advanced

Counts as L&S Credit

File: Friendship-and-Community-syllabus.pdf

ILS 153: Ways of Knowing in Sciences – 4 credits

This is introductory science course for non-science majors provides an overview of scientific discovery and the nature of science. It will explore science as a process of inquiry through five broad scientific concepts representing a range of disciplines: astronomy, geology, chemistry, biology, and ecology/atmospheric sciences.

Requisites - None

Breadth - Physical Science

Level - Elementary

Counts as L&S Credit

File: Syllabus-ILS-153-2022-FINAL-24Jan22.docx

ILS 234: Genres of Western Religious Writing – 3 credits

Writing intensive course based on the conventions in which Western writers have expressed religious ideas. Readings from Jewish, Christian, and other spiritualities. This course introduces some key aspects of Jewish, Christian, and Islamic thought and historical experience by exploring a range of texts from antiquity to the modern era. We begin by considering major themes in the sacred scriptures of each religion – themes conveyed via such literary genres as narrative, law, prophecy, gospel, epistle, apocalyptic, and poetry – with a focus on ways in which later texts interact with earlier ones. The middle unit of the course examines different approaches, in the medieval and early modern periods, to knowing and experiencing the divine. We will consider how monotheistic thinkers drew on Greek ideas about reason and knowledge, and we will read bits of philosophical theology, mystical writing, and polemical treatises on the nature of religious and intellectual authority. In the final course unit we will read two spiritual autobiographies and a novel to explore relationships among religious tradition, identity and the search for meaning in the modern world.

Requisites: Satisfied Communications A requirement

Breadth - Humanities

Level - Intermediate

Counts as L&S Credit

This course fulfills the Communications B requirement.

File: Syllabus-RS-ILS-234-Fall-2021.pdf