ILS 275 / Community and Environment Sociology 375 / Sociology 496 Democracy and Expertise Autumn 2014

First, the bulk of course time will involve seminar-style discussion of readings about democracy, citizenship, and expertise. In addition, students will observe at two different democratic forums and write and re-write papers based on these observations. The semester will begin with a set of readings by Alexander Meiklejohn, the inspiration for this course and the founder of the UW’s Integrated Liberal Studies program.

File: 275Syllabuslecture3KleinmanFall2014.doc

ILS 275 Narratives of Justice and Equality in Multicultural America

Evolving and contested concepts of justice and equality are an integral part of American public life – they play a key role in mediating our relationships with one another and with the state. But where do these ideas come from, and, as significantly, what kind of real-world impact do they have on the lives of individuals hailing from a diverse array of racial, ethnic, cultural, and socioeconomic backgrounds?

File: 275-lecture-1-Peters-CeO-ILS-course-fall-2014.docx

ILS 275 spring 2014 Remix and Appropriation in the Western Tradition

This course will require students to engage a diverse array of texts and topics. The semester will take us from biological evolution to the development of the personal computer to the art of Shepard Fairey to the music of Public Enemy. As we make that meandering journey, we’ll throw around terms like postmodernism, bricolage, and mash-up. However, the course will not simply be an exercise in the mastery of jargon; it will require students to reflect seriously on a variety of creative processes and make linkages between them.

File: 275Lec1Syllabus2PetersSpring2014.docx

ILS 328: Classical Rabbinic Literature in Translation Spring 2019

Judaism today is rabbinic Judaism. From dietary regulations to marriage laws, Jewish
customs are filtered through rabbinic understandings of – and additions to – biblical
traditions. This course examines the literary corpus of the classical rabbinic period (70-
640 C.E.) in order to understand how this group shaped the religion now known as
Judaism. Interacting closely with primary texts in translation, students will learn the
operating principles of rabbinic logic, as well as how scholars (re)construct history based
upon this corpus. In the second half of this course, we will focus on rabbinic topics.
Using drinks and drinking as a test case, students will apply arguments made on the
macro level (i.e., about rabbinic literature in general) to the micro level. Throughout this
course, students will be challenged to question and verify various scholarly assumptions

File: RabbinicLitTranslationSyllabus2019-Rosenhagen.pdf

ILS 340 Fall 2020

Focusing particularly on the world of the ancient Romans, this course (in translation) interrogates the phenomenon and notion of “conspiracy”—as well as the related concepts of “conspiracy theory” and “conspiracism”—within the political, social, cultural, familial, and religious spheres. This course is divided into five parts. The first part offers an introduction to the course and sketches some of the basic phenomena we will be covering. In the second, we investigate some famous political conspiracies, including the so-called “Catilinarian Conspiracy” and the assassination of Julius Caesar. The third part turns to the Roman household to consider the social, familial, and gendered dimensions of domestic conspiracies, including the way that women, children, and enslaved peoples could threaten the notional “tyranny” of the paterfamilias. In the fourth part, we consider prominent religious movements that came into conflict with Roman authorities—especially the mystery cults surrounding Bacchus as well as sects of early Christianity—while the fifth part returns to the concepts of “conspiracy” and “conspiracy theory.” Interspersed throughout are periodic considerations of more
modern phenomena, including the Salem Witch Trials, the Red Scare of the 1950s, QAnon, and even contemporary political events (read: the election), which may, or may not, admit analysis as a “conspiracy” or “conspiracy theory.” As we shall see, “conspiracy” and “conspiracy theory” are useful, yet sometimes tendentious, concepts, which often reveal more about the society and culture in which they occur (as well as those who write about them) than the actual activities they purport to denote.

File: Classics-340-ILS-371-Conspiracy-Nelsestuen.pdf

ILS 340 Spring 2020

Focusing primarily on the world of the ancient Romans, this course (in translation) interrogates the
phenomenon and notion of “conspiracy”—as well as the related concept of “conspiracy theory”—
within the political, social, familial, and religious spheres. Like most good things, this course is divided
into three parts. In the first, we investigate some famous political conspiracies, including the so-called
“Catilinarian Conspiracy” and the assassination of Julius Caesar. The second part turns to the Roman
household to consider the social, familial, and gendered dimensions of domestic conspiracies,
including the way that women, children, and enslaved peoples could threaten the notional “tyranny” of
the paterfamilias. In the final part, we consider prominent religions that came into conflict with
Roman authorities—especially the mystery cults surrounding Bacchus as well as sects of early
Christianity. We will bring to bear the insights gleaned from the ancient world on the modern one in
our consideration of more recent conspiracies and conspiracy theories like the Salem Witch Trials, the
Red Scare of the 1950s, and even contemporary political events, which may, or may not, admit analysis
as a “conspiracy.” As we shall see, “conspiracy” and “conspiracy theory” are useful, yet sometimes
tendentious, concepts, which often reveal more about the society and culture in which they occur (as
well as the authors who write about them) than the actual activities they would seem to denote.

File: Classics-340-ILS-371-Conspiracy-Nelsestuen.pdf

ILS 371 Economy Politics Society Spring 2017

The objective of this course is to examine the ideas of political economy and to question how an
economy should be connected to society. Within this broad objective, there are two specific areas
of study. First, through a careful reading of several important works, we will endeavor to
discover the philosophical origins of political economy. That is, we will set out to find not the
beginnings of political economy as a process of policy making, but rather to uncover the
theoretical motives and problems that give rise to political economy as a way of thinking in
general. Second, we will explore a series of powerful critiques from theoretical quarters and
vantages. In so considering these texts, we shall endeavor not only to discover how they address
the optimism of modern thought, but also to explore the applicability of their arguments at the
dawn of the 21st century. All together, we aim to better understand both the possibilities and the
limitations of the economic organization of life.

File: Economy-Politics-Society_Syllabus_2017_1-1.pdf

ILS 371 Spring 2020

The goal of this course is to provide you with a critical framework for evaluating cultural products (literature, art, and movies) and some basic research skills to do narrative analysis. Myths are around us and, in this class, we are going to read about myths through time. Understanding literature from academia implies acquiring an ability to discover ideas that lay behind words, and then, the reader, has to connect the text in an invisible thread. This implies going beyond the pleasure of reading, to link, find and select what Umberto Eco refers to as an Index that connects the text with our own reading, giving it a unique look. With these two elements, the text and the possible routes of the academy in literature are endless. The aim of this course is that the classroom becomes a melting pot; the place to expose a personal vision of the text, nurtured by the various theories that have critically assessed the works. For over two centuries the myths of the Greeks have provoked fascination and need to make interpretations. History carries myths and the idea of Future is heavy in mythology too. Humans talk to other humans through the use of myths. We are going to learn different ways of interpreting myths and we are going to examine closely the way that gender is portrayed in Myths.

File: 1Syllabus-2020-Myth-and-Cyborgs-blbotero-ILS-Jan-16-2020.doc

ILS 371-2 Fall 2020

“Literature, Art and Violence in Latin America” explores art and literature from a wide range of Latin American countries – Colombia, Brazil, Chile, Mexico, and Puerto Rico to name a few – through historical and psychoanalytic approaches. In doing so, it addresses a wide range of topics: How can art help us understand Latin American violence? What kinds of activism and art can support social change? Students will also become familiar with diverse avant-garde approaches, from Stridentism in Mexico to Brazilian Anthropofagism. We will focus on novels that portrait the violence in different genres like poetry, novels, and theater, as well the work of artists such as Frida Kahlo, Remedios Varo, Leonora Carrington, Tarsila do Amaral, and Doris Salcedo, finding connections between art and literature as a way of speaking from the violence within the margins of culture.

File: 1-Syllabus-Literature-Art-and-Violence-Fall-2020-Botero.doc